Dior Men's Fall/Winter 19 Runway Report
24 January 2019

Dior Men’s Fall/Winter 19 Runway Report

For Dior‘s Men’s Fall/Winter 19 show, the showspacce was certainly minimalist, with classic Dior grey on the outside, and completely black on the inside, but an excellently lit black box, at that. The showspace itself, foreshadowed what was to come on the runway. After his light and “happy” debut collection with the KAWS collab, pastels and florals, this collection took a darker turn, with the collection in a palette of black, pale blue, mauve bisque, pearlised greys, and midnight blue. Models emerged on a 76-metre long conveyor-belt catwalk on which models, serving up Jones’s latest creations: yep, it was indeed a catwalk, without any walking involved.

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

Drawing on Dior’s “sensibility of couture” it was certainly understandable why he chose to have to present the models standing statuesquely, reminiscent of how it was, backing the day, at a couture salon. Jones delved into Dior’s couture heritage, and took inspiration from the shapes, techniques, materials and ethos, and then reinterpreted these in his own way – animalier, drapery, architectural tailoring, deluxe haute couture materials. For FW19, Jones chose Monsieur Dior’s spirit animal, the panther, which he introduced in his first collection in 1947. Other “big cats” too, were part of the collection, with the tiger and leopard patterns in knitwear and on intarsia furs. Couture-like treatments are most evident through tailoring, inlaid with panels of satin as if the lining is exposed, thus making the vests and harnesses completely reversible: a testament to the concept of “perfection” in couture, where the inside should be as perfect as the outside.

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

Drapery, too, has significant importance in couture. The moulage technique, where draping is applied directly on the form, comes through in the diagonally-wrapped tailleur oblique on coats with panels that wrap across buttons, and jackets with panels of fabric on buttons inside, draping to the floor. Cashmere, silk satins, and furs are also combined with technical fabrics so that a high-gloss sheen is achieved, knitwear is also created with a new technique, and lace is cut onto body-hugging sweaters. Nylon is also used to create the illusion of silk, thus making outerwear lightweight and practical.

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

Jones also collaborates with artist Raymond Petitbon, featuring a collection of his existing drawings as well as new works specially-created by the artist, which has been turned into prints, knits, jacquards, and hand-embroideries, for this collection. Petitbon also took inspiration from the Mona Lisa, particularly the one of a pair of eyes staring into the future against an impressionistic sky. The artist also created a spray-painted version of the Dior animal print, called Punk Panthère, which resembles a floral, and reimagined version of the Maison’s logotype, used in jewellery.  Yoon Ahn (of Ambush) once again creates the jewellery in collection, featuring mementos and charms worn as amulets and charm bracelets, as a nod to Monsieur Dior’s superstitious nature.

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

Dior Mens FW19 Runway Looks

The Saddle is now very much a part of the Men’s permanent collection, where bags are concerned. For FW19, we see the bag in nylon or leopard-patterned mink in a new crossbody style, and as a pocket on gloves. Jones also integrates yet another iconic Dior element from the women’s universe, into the men’s line: the signature Cannage quilting.

The Verdict: If you thought animal prints are strictly a FW18 trend since they’re everywhere in stores this season, think again. From what Jones showed on the FW19 runway, it looks as if animal prints are pouncing straight from last Fall, to this year’s. I’m also totally loving the beige-mauve-blue organza combo on the outerwear and blazers too, because that’s a colour combo you certainly don’t see everyday, especially when it comes to men’s suits. Oh, and if you thought the Saddle is how Jones tying both the Men’s and Women’s collections together, that’s not the only way he’s achieving the new One Dior: the utilitarian vests totally remind me of Maria Grazia Chiuri’s SS17 “fencing” collection. Loving the integration between the Men’s and Women’s lines!

 

Images courtesy of Dior