Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Collection
7 June 2019

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Collection

Now considered as one of Louis Vuitton‘s classics, the Capucines, named after the Rue des Capucines, where founder Monsieur Louis Vuitton opened his first Parisian store in 1854, was first introduced in 2013. This year, the Maison has embarked on a collaboration project, #ArtyCapucines, where 6 contemporary artists were invited to reinterpret the bag their very own way. Given full creative license (similar to Dior’s Lady Art Project), artists Nicholas Hlobo, Sam Falls, Tscahabalala Self, Urs Fischer, Alex Israel, and Jonas Woods, were asked to create their very own version and vision, of the Capucines bag, for its 6th Anniversary.

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Campaign

First up, Los Angeles-based artist Sam Falls uses the natural world as inspiration. His artworks are always a play of colour and light through photographic techniques. With a fondness for abstract landscapes, he utilises actual branches, leaves, or flowers, from a particular place, and then dusting them over with pigment and leaving them exposed to environmental elements so that when removed, a blank space that takes the shape of what he placed there, would form patterns on the canvas or surface. For his version of the #ArtyCapucines, he utilised wild flowers and earthy and autumn-inspired colours with reds, greens and yellows made up of micro-dots which reminds me of the toothbrush sort of art that I did when I was young, where we painted over the bristles and then used our fingers to brush over them to create a splatter like effect. The imprints of those flowers that were once placed there, but now removed, leaves the surface untouched by any paint or colour, resulting in a stencil-like effect.

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Campaign

Urs Fischer is known for his large-scale installations and sculptures with one theme in common: the exploration of decay. To illustrate, he created a life-sized Swiss chalet made from loaves of sourdough bread, foam and wood (honestly, I can’t even begin to imagine how it must’ve smelled like, while it was going through the moulding process), as well as the destruction of his own artworks, like his life-sized wax sculptures of people made as candles, which are lit and left to burn until it has completely melted. Fischer’s #ArtyCapucines is in pristine white grained leather, with a banana, dangling off a string at the bottom of the bag.

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Campaign

Nicholas Hlobo‘s art is inspired by his ethnicity and cultural identity. Inspired by South Africa, where he was born, his pieces of art function as social commentaries and narratives of his nation, especially the period since apartheid’s legalised discrimination in was brought to an end in 1994. Hlobo’s artworks, often a reflection of his perceptions of his country, are two-and three-dimensional creations made from discarded materials like leather, ribbons, wood and rubber. His #ArtyCapucines bag features blue discarded leathers forms a beautiful floral motif, with topstitching and hand-embroidery.

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Campaign

Next, is my absolute favourite of all, is by Alex Israel whose previous collaborations include RIMOWA that was launched at the Frieze Art Fair in Los Angeles. No surprises here why this is my absolute favourite, with all that colour blocking going on. Featuring his signature California Wave design, his vibrant interpretation of the #ArtyCapucines bag actually comes with 2 decorative surfboard fins (which have been nicknamed as shark’s fins by some). But, guess what, they actually serve another purpose other than pure decoration: they’re also a comb and mirror, which you can even detach and carry them along in your other bags too!

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Campaign

Tscahabalala Self‘s works of art are more political in nature, because she delves into the significance of the black femininity in contemporary American culture. Often an intersection between race, gender and sexuality, her pieces feature exaggerated female bodies though painting, printmaking, and sewing. Self’s #ArtyCapucines features the Louis Vuitton fleur from the iconic monogram, which she has deconstructed and rebuilt into a more three-dimensional form, using  a colour palette taken from one of her paintings.

Louis Vuitton #ArtyCapucines Campaign

Artist Jonas Wood‘s style is often compared to artists Henri Matisse and David Hockney. Creating pieces of art through a process of layering and collaging of photographs and drawings. Wood looked towards a safari theme, which was seemingly marker-pen illustrated #ArtyCapucines. But, guess what? the design was first digitally printed onto the bag, before embroidering over 200,000 stitches for a more textured look. This otherwise monochromatic bag is accented with the adorable giraffe charm, and pink logo.

If you love the #ArtyCapucines bags, these are limited to 300 numbered pieces each, and are now available upon order, ahead of its global release on 25 June.

 

Images: Louis Vuitton